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20121010
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 11:00pm EDT
in the field to understand how the export. it was a big topic at nasa exploration, but we had never even cognitive science in my home disciplined study exploration in the field as people really explore a new landscape. how did they decide where to go and what tools did they use? i documented how they collected and organized samples that they would analyze the instruments in their laboratories back on earth. i studied how the diagrammed and described their work in their notebooks and how this related to their published work. i observed especially how they tended to work alone or in small groups. but observing the scientists of pasadena, i was taken by the incredible contrast the scientists are indoors in a dark room part of a team doing everything by consensus. people from different disciplines are required to work together. geologists who in the arctic would race to the nearest outcrop on the hill to survey the landscape while working with neurologists who want their rover to stop and take a new sample every few meters along the way and among them were laboratory scientists who had never
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. and it provides a way for them to express their feelings. nasa's 2001 press release announcing the mer project epitomizes the personification of the robots. quote: in 2003 nasa plans to launch a relative of the now-famous 1997 mars pathfinder rover. this larger cousin is expected to reach the surface of the red planet in january 2004. this new robotic explorer will be able to trek up to 100 meters across the surface each martian day. scott hubbard, mars program director at nasa headquarters, said, quote: this mission will give us the first-ever robotic field geologist on mars. now, the metaphors in this poetic narrative such as referring to the earlier mission as mer's cousin simplify for the public's understanding. but they also serve as a kind of cultural cheerleading in praise of america's new robotic explorer. but years later the tone was distinctly sentimental when the associated press reported spirit's demise. quote: spirit, the scrappy robotic geologist that captivated the world with its antics on mars before with getting stuck in a sand trap, is about to meet its end after six producti
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
was the key to his success and the fly by wire system was originally developed by nasa. it was refined over the years. airbus kind of mod deled it in the 320, it was a huge part of success of that landing. because there wasn't a single hero to point to, we didn't, you can't put 1,000 engears own the cover of "time" magazine, right? so you put one person on the cover of "time" magazine. so often it is that tinkering and improving and modifying with thousands of minds working on a problem, how do you make an airplane safe really responsible for the progress we have in our society. one of the things i've tried to do in a way i try to do with a lot of my books is to tell story of group collaboration where people come together from different backgrounds and work to make the world a better ple. >> host: you write, i suspect in the long run the media bias against stories of incremental progress may be more damaging than any bias the media display toward the political left and right. >> guest: around that point in the book i have a kind of a social studies quiz of other, kind of key indices of soci
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
. it was a big topic at nasa exploration, but we had never even cognitive science in my home disciplined study exploration in the field as people really explore a new landscape. how did they decide where to go and what tools did they use? i documented how they collected and organized samples that they would analyze the instruments in their laboratories back on earth. i studied how the diagrammed and described their work in their notebooks and how this related to their published work. i observed especially how they tended to work alone or in small groups. but observing the scientists of pasadena, i was taken by the incredible contrast the scientists are indoors in a dark room part of a team doing everything by consensus. people from different disciplines are required to work together. geologists who in the arctic would race to the nearest outcrop on the hill to survey the landscape while working with neurologists who want their rover to stop and take a new sample every few meters along the way and among them were laboratory scientists who had never done fieldwork before. so, working remotely th
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
energy independence so we can get those jobs. with regards to the tax-cut, i am not looking to cut nasa's taxes and reduce revenues going to the government. my number one principle is there will be no tax cut that adds to the deficit. no tax cuts as to the deficit. but i do want to reduce the burden being paid by middle income americans. to do that that means i cannot reduce the burden paid by high income americans. any language to the contrary simply not accurate. >> moderator: mr. president. obama: let's talk about taxes because they think it is instructive. four years ago when i stood on the stage, i said that i would cut taxes for middle-class families and that's exactly what i did. we cut taxes for middle-class families by about $3600. and the reason is because i believe that we do best when the middle class is doing well. and by giving them those taxes, they have a little more money in their pocket, so maybe they can bite in your car. they are certainly a better position to weather the extraordinary recession we went through. they can buy a computer for the kid going to college. t
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
challenged nasa to have someone on the moon and the next decade and they were able to accomplish what seems to me looking at it through the historical prism an extraordinary feat. is this harder than that? >> this is not harder than not. that was certainly an extraordinary feat and as a student of that i know that you know there are numerous setbacks along the way and there was concurrent development of the technology that had to work together in synchronous city. it didn't happen without setbacks. we can certainly as americans accomplish anything we could our mind to. we view nextgen as one of the most important infrastructure investments that we need to make as a nation. and as you've heard before, as an element of u.s. technological leadership nationwide. so we take very seriously. we appreciate the support the congress has shown for nextgen. we are starting to see, and it's easier on the inside sometimes to see the progress that is being made in the operationally deploying usable parts of the stock or making a meaningful difference in terms of completing the flights in bad weather and n
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
having fun postal service and the schools and programs like nasa that had kicked back and have given wonderful technologies that propelled us and meet people's lives more comfortable than they would have been had those technologies not entered their lives. >> host: question for you, louis. given what you say is the benefit of the government, right now is the government about the right size and what is its influence on your life? >> caller: i.t. we have to be careful when we throw the word size of the government because they're seems to be a misunderstanding as to what the size of the government is as well as the size of the government. but the reality is the problems dictate the size of the government and we shrink the government by reducing the number of federal employees and we actually then end up contacting people to do those tasks any way and we tend not to count them as the part of the government that they are a part of the government. we are just paying more for that resource now and people need to kind of recognize that when we take our resources it is a finite amount. it tru
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)